Tax year ending

Dominic Thomas
Feb 2023  •  12 min read

Tax year ending!

There are not many weeks left of the 22/23 tax year, which ends on Wednesday 5th April. As a brief reminder of the key issues, I have done a quick summary … if you are not sure of what you have used or what you can use, please get in touch with us as soon as you can.

PENSIONS

  • Everyone under the age of 75 can contribute £2,880 into a pension and get basic rate tax relief, irrespective of any income. This is as close as it gets to ‘money for nothing’
  • The annual allowance of £40,000 applies to those with incomes of £3,600 – £240,000. You and an employer may contribute up to 100% of your earned income (capped at £40,000) between you
  • Those earning over £240,000 need to be careful; your allowance reduces by £1 for every £2 of income over £240,000 until it reaches £4,000 – which includes any employer payments

ISAs – INDIVIDUAL SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

  • Any adult can invest up to £20,000 over the course of the tax year into an ISA which grows free of income tax and capital gains tax
  • Those aged 18-40 can use a Lifetime ISA allowance of £4,000 if this is for a deposit on a first ever home. The Government will add £1,000

CAPITAL GAINS

  • If you are selling an asset / investment (which would include rebalancing them) this triggers capital gains. The 22/23 allowance is £12,300 of gains before you pay any tax, but this is falling in 23/24 to just £6,000 and then £3,000 the following tax year. So if you are going to do this anyway, I would encourage you to get on with it – perhaps you have some shares that you don’t really want …
  • Trusts also pay capital gains, but only have half of the personal allowance, so even more incentive to take profits and rebalance
  • You can delay payment of capital gains tax using some investments (ask/see below)

INCOME

  • If your income exceeds £100,000, you begin to have your personal allowance of £12,570 reduced by 50p for every £1 above £100,000. The personal allowance is the amount of income taxed at 0%. So it would be prudent to have bonuses paid into pensions for example
  • Dividends – the first £2,000 of dividends is tax-free in 22/23
  • Interest for non or basic rate taxpayers is 0% on the first £1,000 of interest (savings allowance) and £500 for higher rate taxpayers. Additional rate (45%) taxpayers don’t get the allowance. As some deposit accounts now pay 3% or 4%, you may be drawn into this (a higher rate taxpayer only needs £16,666 in savings earning 3% interest of £499. You need to declare all income to HMRC through self assessment
  • If you really must insist on a cash ISA (please only for ‘short-term parking’ of money) then this would ensure the interest is tax-free, but rates on cash ISAs are much lower than savings accounts now
  • If you are not using your full personal allowance and have investments that provide taxable income, this may be a sensible moment to trigger income that uses your allowance
  • If you rent a room in your home, there is a tax-free rent-a-room allowance of £7,500

ANNUAL GIVING

  • You can gift £3,000 to any individual without recourse to tax by the recipient or your estate. If you do any substantial giving please put a scan of a signed note of this on our portal
  • If you are feeling generous, you are also permitted to gift your newlywed children £5,000 or grandchildren £2,500

SPOUSE ALLOWANCES

  • If you have a spouse who does not earn up to the personal allowance of £12,570, you can elect to have 10% of this (£1,257) added to your own allowance
  • Spouses also can benefit from sharing assets and effectively doubling exemptions and allowances

ALTERNATIVES & HIGH-RISK INVESTING

It is generally thought that VCTs, EIS and SEIS are really for more sophisticated investors, about 3% of the population. All are long term in nature – meaning 6-10 years. Unlike your portfolio elsewhere (which – if we are managing it – will be an enormous portfolio of global equities), these are very small by comparison. Do not do these on your own unless you know your Sharpe ratio from your Beta. Unlike the above, the investments below can experience permanent loss:

Venture Capital Trusts

  • Tax-free income from your investment
  • Tax-free capital gains
  • Tax relief of 30% on your initial investment (tax reducer)

Enterprise Investment Schemes

  • 30% tax relief on your investment
  • The ability to defer owed capital gains tax
  • Loss relief
  • Exempt from inheritance tax

Seed Enterprise Investment Schemes

  • 50% tax relief on your investment
  • Reduce your due capital gains tax bill by 50% immediately
  • Exempt from inheritance tax

DON’T FORGET

Income taxes are tiered. Each slice of your income is taxed at a different rate.

Band Taxable income Tax rate
Personal Allowance Up to £12,570 0%
Basic rate £12,571 to £50,270 20%
Higher rate £50,271 to £150,000 40%
Additional rate over £150,000 45%

Please remember that HMRC will apply penalties for late payment and fines for non-payment which can result in the very worst of punitive measures – a custodial sentence.

As ever, be sure of two things – death and taxes. Neither are terribly welcome.

Tax year ending2023-12-01T12:12:37+00:00

The November budget

The November budget

The problem of having a deadline for publication is that life tends to throw up some new important information just at the wrong time. The chaos of the ‘mini-budget’ resulted in a new Prime Minister and Chancellor. The Budget on 17th November was set to herald tax rises. So, what has been announced?

NOVEMBER – INCOME TAX

Tax thresholds have been frozen, save the additional rate of tax threshold, which now begins sooner, meaning that more people will pay 45% tax, starting at £125,140 instead of £150,000. What this means in practice for someone now brought into additional rate (earning £150,000) is that they pay 5% more income tax on their earnings above £125,140.  If you earn £150,000 you would pay £1,243 more income tax as a result of this change, (£11,187 as opposed to £9,944) effectively £103.58 a month more. Whilst politicians talk of short-term pain, the projections show this measure for 5 years.

NOVEMBER – CAPITAL GAINS TAX

Capital Gains allowances have been cut substantially, reducing from £12,500 to £6,000 from April 2023 and then to £3,000 from April 2024.  Trusts have a CGT allowance of half the personal allowance. So realising gains this tax year will be more effective than in future years.

As a reminder, this is the permitted gains on assets being sold with a 0% tax rate before being taxed at 10% or 20%, unless that asset is a second property in which case its 18% or 28%. So if you are a landlord, sell before April 5th to maximise your allowances.

I had expected the rates of tax to increase in line with income taxes rather than the allowance being altered and mostly scrapped entirely. In any event, capital gains tax allowance reductions makes your annual ISA, Pension, VCT, EIS allowances all even more attractive, sheltering funds from CGT in different ways.

NOVEMBER- DIVIDENDS

The Dividend allowance has also been slashed. This will mostly impact those with a small business whereby family members or staff can have a share of profits (dividends) tax free. The first £2,000 of dividends are currently tax free, this will reduce to £1,000 from the new tax year and then £500 in the next ..

NOVEMBER – PENSIONS

It would seem that there are no changes, which is frankly a bit of a surprise. The annual allowance remains at £40,000 unless you have income over £200,000 when a reduced (tapered) allowance would apply. The Lifetime Allowance has remained in place. If you are an NHS employee, I cannot find anything in the 70 page statement to help you with your annual allowance problems and there is nothing about the tapered annual allowance. So, sadly, more senior doctors will likely reduce their NHS hours or otherwise face tax charges on income that they have not had. We can help crunch the numbers, but if anyone is in a position to ‘get it’, Mr Hunt is but seems to have chosen not to.

NOVEMBER – STATE PENSIONS

If you are receiving your State Pension, it’s going to increase by 10% in April. If you haven’t started taking yours, well you are also likely to have to wait until you are much older to get one. Everyone knows this is a political ‘hot potato’ and the younger generations are unlikely to receive a State Pension until at least 68 (and this will probably be increased in the announcement in early 2023).

NOVEMBER – FEELING FROZEN?

You are going to need to ‘let it go’ … that is – hopes of seeing the end of frozen allowances ending any time soon. The personal allowance, slice of basic rate and higher rate tax tiers were all frozen anyway, but the deep freeze has been extended by two further years. Due to inflation and rising salaries, this will in itself raise more tax. This is part of what critics call ‘stealth taxes’ – the sort you don’t really register (much like inflation eroding your cash) – you only tend to notice after a few years of going backwards.

The Energy Price Guarantee will be maintained through the Winter, limiting typical energy bills to £2,500, this will increase to £3,000 from April. It is generally expected that energy prices will remain high for the next 12 months. To be blunt, nobody knows because it all rather depends on the Russians. One point to note is that the energy savings you may be making now will likely continue as the Government intend to reduce energy consumption by 15% by the end of the decade. To put that into perspective, that’s about the same as making your use of energy in 10 months last a year.

PROPERTY

The British obsession with houses continues to be supported by Government policy. The tax when buying property (Stamp Duty Land Tax) was reduced in September doubling the first tier of SDLT with a 0% tax rate from £125,000 to £250,000. For First Time Buyers this is extended from £300,000 to £425,000. These measures will end on 31st March 2025. If you are going to move or buy your first home and want to benefit from this fully, do so before March 2025.

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

The November budget2023-12-01T12:12:41+00:00

What is the tax free Savings Income band?

What is the tax free savings income band?

You may have heard about the new tax free savings income band – in that the first £5,000 of interest is tax free from April 2015. Well it is and it isn’t… sadly it is another example of something that is true, but not true for many…. or another example of smoke and mirrors exemplified in Budget announcements.

With effect from 6th April 2015 the 10% starting rate of tax for savings income was replaced by a new 0% rate and the band increased from £2,880 to £5,000. This means that, in 2015/16, those with a total income of less than £15,600 (£10,600 personal allowance for 2015/16 plus the new 0% starting rate band) will pay no tax on their savings (the total income figure is £15,660 for those born before 6th April 1938).

Here is the smoke and mirror bit…

Non-savings income (i.e. earned income and pension income) is always taxed before savings income so the new tax -free £5,000 starting rate band can only apply to those earning less than the total of their personal allowance and the 0% starting rate band. In short, if you have taxable income under £15,000 from all sources, then you gain this allowance, but not if you have earned income – which could come from a pension.

Reclaiming Forms

The rules around completion of form R85 are changing from 6th April so that any saver who is unlikely to be liable to tax on any of their savings income (until now it has been total income) in the tax year can complete an R85 (one form for each bank/building society) and register to receive interest without tax deducted – even if they pay tax on other (non-savings) income. Click here to see the R85 forms.

Where tax is likely to be due on some savings income (for example, earned income is £12,000 and savings income is £4,000 meaning that £400 of savings income is taxable) a form R85 can’t be completed. The overpaid tax (i.e. up to the overall £15,600 threshold) will have to be claimed back from HMRC using form R40 or under self-assessment. Click here for an R40 form.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

What is the tax free Savings Income band?2023-12-01T12:20:11+00:00
Go to Top