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CRASHING PRACTICE

CRASHING PRACTICE

It has now been ten years since the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the investment bank at the centre of the credit crunch. The impact of this has been felt here in Britain with years of austerity, tax rises and pay cuts. You and I have lived with the consequences and are mindful that it may happen again.

In reality a market crash happens about 25% of the time and despite required regulatory warnings that the value of investments may go down as well as up, the reality is that they will fall in value and they will rise in value. Fact. The issue is not if they will but when and why. As a financial planner I am sorry to tell you that those offering to know when or why are delusional fraudsters. We only know after the event and frankly, even then we may not truly understand why.

Time in the markets, not timing the markets

The unvarnished truth is that over time, over decades, investment in mainstream equities rise in value. This is proven time and time again. However, few of us are very good at thinking long-term and obsess over the short-term. This is for good reason – we can relate much more readily to the short-term and cope better planning for it, but thinking longer-term and much further ahead proves very difficult for us. Inevitably investors are persuaded by the short-term reality more than the long-term probability.

The Lehman Trilogy 

It is timely that “The Lehman Trilogy” by Stefano Massini was shown at the National Theatre to “sell out” audiences. So much so that the production is moving to the Piccadilly Theatre in May next year. The play charts the early beginnings of Lehman’s, arriving in New York. Their story is familiar. In 1844 Hayum Lehmann arrives with nothing, moves to Alabama and starts a modest shop selling equipment to farmers. Along with the new business is a new name Henry Lehman is born or created. His brother Mendel follows a couple of years later and finally Mayer arrives in 1850. Lehman Brothers.

150 years in the making 

Their story unfolds, experiencing the ups and downs of commercial life, but also reflecting the wider society and the development of business and capitalism. Disaster and opportunity meet along the way, the business diversifies becoming a cotton buyer and then trader. Experiencing blight, fire and the American Civil War, using maths and credit to smooth the path from the present to the future, eventually becoming a bank in 1867 to help rebuild the nation. Agricultural know-how becomes financing of business. Throughout all challenges, adapting and surviving. In many respects Lehman’s practiced crashing – regularly experiencing very dire trading circumstances, yet confused survival for skill and ultimately began to believe that they could not pick anything but winners…

The story is wonderfully presented by Sam Mendes and the three actors (Simon Russell Beale, Ben Miles and Adam Godley) were brilliant. A single, rotating minimalist set and the audience is transported through time, which you should allow 3 hours to cover 150 years that is very well spent. If you get the chance to see it in 2019, I would recommend getting tickets early. Here is a link to the ATG ticket booking site if you are interested.

Here is Sam Mendes talking about the production at the National Theatre.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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CRASHING PRACTICE2018-11-07T17:13:31+00:00

MONEY OFFERS OPPORTUNITY

MONEY OFFERS OPPORTUNITY

For some people the answer to almost any question is money. Whilst I would not underestimate its power, money is simply a method of exchange. In the most part having money means having choices and more opportunities. This doesn’t mean that those without it have no choices or no opportunities, but quite obviously they are much more limited.

Money is the oil in a system to get things done. However as is also pretty evident, possessing a lot of wealth does not really mean that more opportunities are taken, indeed choices might appear to become more limited, falling into social expectations about what to buy, possess, retain whilst protecting with ever more complex security.

SOLOMONS IFA REVIEW BLOG BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE

CRIMINAL INTENT

There are always those that are willing to extract your money from you. This week I had yet another person confide in me that they were victims of a financial scam and felt too ashamed or embarrassed to admit it to others. Most of us, of course, work hard for our earnings, we don’t steel of kill for it. That said, one of the myths that I grew up with was that hard work pays. This is quite obviously not true. Plenty of people work hard or long hours and are not well paid, existing just above the bread-line, hence the need to work long hours. There are others that simply work in a way that by no measure appears “hard” yet are rewarded or remunerated very handsomely. This is of course simply another of life’s “welcome to adulthood” lessons.

DESPERATE TIMES AND DESPERATE MEASURES

Those with very few opportunities, that possess the right skills at the right time can have their lives improved enormously by some helpful cash. One of the few common agreements about the Chancellor’s Budget is an unsaid one… we all would like to keep or get a bit more.

Take Darlene Sweet, a singer is living hand to mouth, gig-to-gig, struggling to get by and desperate for a moment, a lucky break. It’s all about the books you read, the places you visit and the people you meet… right? Well for Darlene, she happened to check into a hotel (the El Royale) near Lake Tahoe, on the border with Nevada and California… but the other guests, staff and hotel are not all that they appear to be.

The latest movie “Bad Times at the El Royale” by director Drew Goddard plays with our sense of security, individuality and ability to adapt to new information. What people will do to protect their own interests, how they respond to extortion and how easily manipulated most of us are. A bad night for the guests, made worse with the arrival of Billy Lee, a knock off of Charles Manson, duping followers with half-truths about money, power and corruption, explaining choice whilst amassing greater wealth and abusing the power he has over those that trust him. The proverbial thief in the night…

Here’s the trailer for the new movie. There was a fair bit of disagreement within my family about whether the movie is any good, I found it quite gripping and delightfully shot – with scenes reminiscent of Nighthawks by Hopper. My daughter however felt it dragged, the acting was poor and the entire thing overly simplistic…

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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MONEY OFFERS OPPORTUNITY2018-11-07T15:43:25+00:00

WHEN MONEY TALKS AND WE DON’T

WHEN MONEY TALKS AND WE DON’T

The lack of money will test anyone and has a tendency to play havoc with relationships. This is explored in the new movie “Wildlife” starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Carey Mulligan and new, rising star Ed Oxenbould. Set in the late 1950s at the crossroads of domestic politics in the US, we enter the world of an aspirational family. Jerry and Jeanette Brinson are shackled by their class background and struggling with compromises between their traditional upbringing and the reality of life as they experience it.

Jerry loses his job which seems to be something of a familiar story, this forces them to confront how the family might realistically pull together, meaning Jeanette would need to find work. Their son Joe helps out too, by finding after school work. Whilst the lack of money may be the catalyst, the sad reality is that the Brinson’s are not good communicators, each having flaws that make things worse rather than any better. Their dysfunction is played out before Joe, who struggles to comprehend how his once seemingly nice, normal family life becomes a chaotic lonely environment.

SOLOMONS IFA: MONEY STRESS IN WILDLIFE

Fighting the Bonfire of our Vanities

Whilst set in the late 1950s and early 1960s, there are of course parallels for today. The lack of work in parts of any country turns it into a wasteland with few signs of hope. Whilst it is undeniably true that the percentage of people in poverty is reducing, this does not mean that life is easy or even good for many people. It is precisely this lack of hope, the desire to blame anyone or anything different, that certain politicians will take advantage of. The sense of shame in being poor and the anxiety that it produces cannot be overstated. Jeanette will trade her dignity for security. Jerry will dice with death just to demonstrate his contempt for his lot. Joe, meanwhile (a boomer) is caught in the crossfire, trying to make sense of the gap between child and adult and what becoming a man might mean for him.

You get one lifetime but another shot at honesty

One of the biggest assumptions that financial plans make is that a couple remains together. Sadly, this can often be a mistake. That’s not to say that divorce or separation are a “sad” thing, it can be healing and of course healthier. What I mean is that the self-awareness required to allow for this or make provision for it is often lacking. The assumptions being made about investment returns or taxes are frankly small beer when it comes to division of assets and the implications for all.

Here’s the trailer.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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WHEN MONEY TALKS AND WE DON’T2018-11-07T13:35:47+00:00

RETURN TO THE 1970s

RETURN TO THE 1970s

There has been a fair bit of talk about aspects of our current political rhetoric that threaten a return to the 1970s. Whilst my early childhood was pretty care-free in that time, there is little of the 70s that I would welcome back.

Insert a film set in the 70’s. A bleak story of a character that everyone’s limited television of the time cannot fail to recognise. “Funny Cow” has a title to offend and a story that will offer little other than despair as it pushes all the stereotypes and clichés of the time. The miserable family existence that passes for life in a northern town. The wife-beating, loud-mouthed husbands and the hollowed shells of wives that have turned to the new prison of alcoholism. Yet sadly this is very close to her story.

Solomons IFA review of Funny Cow the movie

A galaxy far, far away…

If you are inclined to revisit the 70s then this film is a reminder that it really is best left consigned to the past and a collection of good memories when we were all younger. The times were very different and have thankfully changed for the better. It seems like a long time ago… a galaxy far, far away… yet in practice it’s just 4 decades ago, closing in on 5. In reality that is the sort of time that most investors save and then live off their investments.

Short-term memory

The changes in our lives are not always easy to see but flipping through your photograph albums (remember them?) is a useful reminder of our journey. When it comes to investments, the opposite happens. We are constantly bombarded with a moment by moment update of the markets, what has changed in the last 5 minutes, rarely does anyone report or assess the long-term value of investing, billboards, newspapers, emails and websites are all set to the short term, as if this tells us anything of value. In reality the valuable information is surely only the long-term results. What has happened over not 3, 6 or 12 months, but over 10, 15, 20, 25 years. However, that requires a patience that most of us have been taught to ignore.

Here is the trailer for “Funny Cow” it’s well acted, (Maxine Peake is very good) but frankly unless you want to watch misery unfold for a lengthy 102 minutes, (the irony isn’t lost on me) a better use of your time would be to sort out those photos you still haven’t put into an album… or had one printed.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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RETURN TO THE 1970s2018-11-02T23:36:16+00:00

CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?

CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?

One of the movies that I enjoyed at the BFI London Film Festival was “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”. You may remember the story about an American biography writer who, was a fairly difficult person to be around. Most of us are aware of the difficulties in earning a living as a writer. Some do exceedingly well, most struggle to repeat the success of one or two notable works.

Lee Israel is one such author, having published a couple of biographies, writers block or creative inertia sets in. Inevitably the reality of paying bills becomes increasingly harder. Her management of stress (or lack of) resulted in having nobody to turn to for comfort or encouragement. Aside from a cat, social connections are as sparse as the flow of words on the blank page that stares back at her. She happens upon Jack Hock, (Richard E Grant) an Englishman surfing the bars and streets of New York. He becomes her only confidant and accomplice.

Solomons IFA review Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Finders Keepers?

Opportunity presents itself whilst doing research, she finds a letter hidden within the pages of a library book. Hoping nobody has noticed and applying “finders-keepers” she takes it. The letter is sold to pay her rent. The idea takes hold that personalised letters from deceased authors and actors are collectable. Israel has a genuine talent for understanding character and replicating their voice. She sets about forging letters and selling them to dealers, who invariably lack the motivation to have the letters authenticated. They appear to be what they probably could not be, yet money changes hands, because money talks. This eventually evolves into stealing genuine letters and replacing them with forgeries.

Research and Evidence 

Eventually the FBI close in on Israel, hence how her story is known. There is little to suggest that this is a criminal mastermind or indeed a particularly tenacious investigation by the FBI, who seem sufficiently inept as to tip her off that they will be examining her apartment, enabling Israel to dispose of all evidence of her wrongdoing.

Financial Fraud 

You may have a perspective on this sort of criminal act, forgery. Yet again, this is an example of what people will do under the wrong pressures. However, it is also evident that people are often persuaded by appearances and rarely look beneath. This is particularly pertinent in most financial fraud. The temptation of market beating returns or guarantees, when a closer inspection will reveal something altogether different. The regulator does its best to prevent financial fraud, but of course this is all part of the human condition, to play upon the duplicity or naivety of others. Fraud is something that we are constantly checking, but many are duped. As we are now in the season of keeping warm inside, if you or your friends are discussing the latest fantastic offering, please remember this – and ask for proper, regulated advice.

I enjoyed the movie, which stars Melissa McCarthy providing a really sharp portrayal of Lee Israel and Richard E Grant as Jack Hock. Here is the trailer.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?2018-10-31T14:09:00+00:00

FIRST MAN

TODAY’S BLOG

FIRST MAN

The new film about Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, is a compelling story. Next year will be the 50th anniversary of the moon landing in 1969. The world was gripped by faint black and white images streamed around the world from another one. I do not remember the event, I was a few months old enjoying an ice cream on a visit to my grandparents. There’s even footage to prove it – though its lack of sound exposes the gap between widespread technology of the day compared to NASA.

I’ve grown up being fascinated by space, a product of my time and childhood posters of the Americans on the moon. This new movie is the story of Armstrong, much of which I did not know. The advantage of cinematic technology is that the audience are taken on the ride which feels very realistic. We ride up on Gemini and Apollo with deafening sounds of rockets, fire and metal. We can only marvel at the courage of anyone that has boldly gone where no one has gone before. Every experience new and unique, full of thousands of “what if’s”. I am only able to applaud the sort of courage I lack and the genius of the engineers, mathematicians and scientists involved.

The Sea of Tranquility

This is also the story of a family, one that isn’t terribly good at communicating. Their own inability to communicate well is echoed by the silence of space and the sea of tranquillity. We witness this through tragedy, but it is the constant silence of the background noise.

Financial planning is all about your story. You and I may not make history, but we certainly impact those that know us. Good communication in any relationship is a major element of its success. Yet many struggle to express their feelings and hopes when it comes to money. Couples have their own backgrounds that inform their own decisions and these are rarely always complimentary. Much is unsaid. Yet for any financial plan to achieve the results that you want, communication is all. This is far more complex than simply helping you get from A to B.

History in the Making

Your financial plan might be unique, but you don’t have to be the test pilot for the tools that help you. You can rely on timeless principles of investment markets and ancient realities – all things will pass. Today is tomorrow’s history. As with the skill set deployed by Armstrong, some is art, some is science and some is intuition. The issues for all of us to understand are the real risks that we run and the importance of a stress-tested plan. You may not have the need, desire or resources to get to the moon, but wherever you want to go, understanding what horizon you are looking at and what the compass is telling you are vital.

Here is the trailer… one thing that I noticed during the film was the music. It has a very familiar tune. You may remember that Mr Gosling starred in LA LA LAND which almost won the Best Picture OSCAR by mistake, against… well Moonlight. Just saying…

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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info@solomonsifa.co.uk    Call – 020 8542 8084

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GET IN TOUCH

Solomon’s Independent Financial Advisers
The Old Bakery, 2D Edna Road, Raynes Park, London, SW20 8BT

info@solomonsifa.co.uk    Call – 020 8542 8084

SOLOMON’S FINANCIAL PLANNING APP

Our free powerful new Finance & Tax app.
To get started download and use password – solomons

   

WHAT WE’RE ALL ABOUT

If you would like a no-nonsense one page document explaining what financial planning is all about please enter your email here.

FIRST MAN2018-10-18T17:35:47+00:00

SHREDDED

SHREDDED

I wonder if you have seen the video of the moment that a Banksy piece was shredded as soon as it was sold. There has been speculation about whether this was simply a stunt or a genuine attempt to expose the folly of the art world. It does not matter, nothing will change. The world we live in is obsessed by fame and will spend vast sums to share in its light. It is always something of a mystery that so many will be taken in by so few.

The financial services world is no different. Obsessing over performance that happened and marketing investment gurus or fund manager as stars. Fund Managers are actually given stars by ratings agencies. Those same agencies that told us all that day was night when it came to “creditworthiness” before the credit crunch.

Drawn to Success

Time has moved on, memories fade. Promises of lessons to be learned have come and gone. We are still lured by the glisten of success. Little has changed to investor behaviour. It is about as bad as it has always been. We may have some new terms or names for it, may even be able to spot it a mile off, but few are willing or able to adopt behaviours that are actually successful.

To be a successful investor you have to take a long-term view. You ought to hold a high proportion of your portfolio in a globally diversified portfolio of equities, bought as inexpensively as possible and held, ideally within a wrapper that enables you to choose how and when you draw money to suit both your circumstances and taxation. That is pretty much it…

You can attempt to beat the market, through selecting specific stocks/shares but remember that this has at least two key decisions – when to buy and when to sell. Few people achieve this with any repeatable success. They will tell you that they do, but the truth is rather different. Conveniently forgetting their losses which make up their averaged net returns.

There will always be someone willing to forecast precisely what will happen in the future. In a planet of over 7 billion people, there are plenty of them. Many will promote their views as alternative or counter-narrative, pandering to your sense of doom, or throw so much money and impressive glossy statistics at marketing a theory that you come to believe that they really are onto something different. Occasionally they will be right for a time.

Unvarnished Truths 

Here are some truths. If you plan to withdraw money within the short-term, bank it, do not invest it. If you wish to build the value of your money so that you have a shot at financial independence, invest. Invest cheaply, invest long-term, invest heavily in equities, invest globally. Invest with an understanding of taxes. If you want to give yourself a good dose of anxiety, look at your portfolio on a regular basis. If you want to enjoy life, don’t – but have a plan and make sure that someone is monitoring yours.

Normal and Ordinary Perfection 

Remember that market corrections are normal, crashes are normal, booms are normal. We do not know when and mostly do not know why. You cannot control the markets, it is impossible to time investments perfectly in a repeatable way. The same cannot be said for Banksy, who timed his (or her) shredding of “Girl With Balloon” to perfection, shredding it… whether the value has depreciated or in fact appreciated is a debatable point and only time will tell…

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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SHREDDED2018-10-10T08:52:09+00:00

OUR APP – MILEAGE TRACKER

OUR APP MILEAGE TRACKER

The mileage tracker within our app has now been updated and improved. This mainly means that it is now even easier to accurately record your business mileage. You need to make a few adjustments such as turning on the GPS tracker and ensuring your personal details are accurate (an email is sent to you with the trips that you do).

The app is loaded with useful tools, many are aimed at those working and needing to report expenses, but also includes all the details about personal income tax and allowances that are relevant to everyone. There are also some great calculators too. All this is free for you to download and use. It costs us quite a bit to provide this, so please do make use of the app and let others know.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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OUR APP – MILEAGE TRACKER2018-10-09T17:40:50+00:00

A STAR IS BORN

A Star Is Born

The latest reworking of A Star Is Born is currently showing in cinemas. The tale is familiar partly because it is simply a remake and partly because this is familiar Hollywood ground. It is difficult to not be cynical about the simple commercialism of this remake, directed by and starring Bradley Cooper and muse de jour Lady Gaga. These two are already global stars in their respective fields, so there was always a high chance of ker-ching at the box office.

There is nothing terribly wrong with the film. I had low expectations and so was relieved that it wasn’t as bad as I feared. Cooper is good as an actor, though heavy handed in direction and at 2 hours 15 it is about 45 minutes too long. If he is to repeat this role, he needs to learn the art of editing. Despite the screen time characterisation is thin – which is probably being kind. Certainly, this is yet another story about an alcoholic with money. The temporary relief of a woman to love and inspire him to better behaviour is insufficient.

Power Chord

Lady Gaga can certainly sing and this element of her performance is powerful. Watching her however, you were always conscious that this is Lady Gaga – which is not the purpose of film. Jackson Maine (Cooper) is towards the end of his country music career (really?) and drunkenly happens upon Ally (Gaga) who is performing at a drag club after her shift as a waitress. The only female to do so. He is enthralled and within 24 hours has written a song for her which they perform as a duet without any rehearsal. This from a man that is apparently nearly deaf and mainly drunk.

Instant World Fame

A video of this new encounter goes viral and Ally is immediately touring the world with Jack, from Arizona to Glastonbury. The depth and soulfulness of Ally’s songs is her appeal, yet a new English manager (Rafi Gavron) presumably a shade of Cowell, basically shapes her into a pop-tastic dancing pop-ster much like Gaga herself. The supposedly feisty Ally complies without any significant artistic difference. An almost out of body performance on Saturday Night Live which is really Gaga being Gaga. Yet this is nothing like the Ally we were all quite blown away by. Inconsistency aside, her success immediately casts Jack into the shadows where he swiftly finds substances to abuse.

The story could have moved in various directions but failed to explore the backstory of the main characters. There is no help other than the usual Betty Ford type clinic, yet nothing to get under the skin of why. We are told that alcoholism is a disease. It isn’t, it’s simply yet another way of coping with trauma.  The Hollywood problem is really one where nobody has the courage to say “no”.

Are We There Yet?

Admittedly, the story is meant to be partly about ambition, but the Vegas style marriage of a bad idea holds little to convince an audience that this is a deep connection, more one of convenience. We know and probably don’t care that much if Ally and Jack are just another 3-minute track on the playlist of life. The timeframe of the story shifts along at the pace of someone trying to fit in filming between pop tours, yet drags with the numbness of a long-haul coach ride.

We learn nothing new about fame, fortune, alcoholism or ambition, but there’s a soundtrack in it.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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A STAR IS BORN2018-10-05T14:17:15+00:00

THE WIFE

The Wife

A wife is many things.  Perhaps nothing quite demonstrates religious, political or cultural difference as how a wife is defined. How she is enabled or not. This new film starring the wonderful Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce is a timely piece for gender politics. In many respects the film treads the line of the traditional, supportive American wife. She has given up a career, her dreams have become his and she has watched and supported him to thrive.

Set in the early 1990s, we are introduced to Joan and Joe Castleman. Joe is woken by the ringing bedside telephone (remember those?) and informed that he is to be the recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature. It seems that the call is expected, Joe does not wish to hear the news until Joan is also able to hear the confirmation at the same time on the other handset. This is the pinnacle of his career and reward for his vast body of work. Naturally, celebration and a trip to Stockholm follow with struggling, moody writer son in tow.

A Great Woman

We have all heard the phrase “behind every great man, there is a great woman”. This film explores that concept with dark humour. Joe is gradually revealed as a womanising narcissist who trots out the same well-worn and apparently successful pick-up lines. He has a penchant for younger women and despite his evident infidelity is constantly permitted to return to his devoted Joan. This always confounds me.

Through a series of flashbacks to earlier days, we witness the start of Joe and Joan’s relationship. Joe is Joan’s English tutor at University. She develops a crush, does some babysitting for Joe and his first wife which results in a novel “The Faculty Wife” which Joe is clearly pleased with. His teaching is inspirational. However, politics of the day pose a difficult, if not impossible path for female authors. Joan is discouraged from even trying to write by author Elaine Mozell (Elizabeth McGovern)

On the plane (Concorde) to Stockholm, writer Nathaniel Bone (Christian Slater) congratulates Joe on his award and presses him for a meeting to discuss the biography that Bone plans to write about him. Joe is irritated by the interruption and makes it clear that he has no interest in a biography. Joan warns him not to be chiding and to take a more diplomatic approach. Making enemies with a writer is unwise. This signifies the moment that Joan begins to reflect on the choices she has made and their impact on her family.

I shall not spoil the story for you.

Hidden Numbers?

I have met hundreds, perhaps thousands of couples in a professional capacity. All are different. Some keep their finances very separate, some very fused and some rather dissolved. It is common for one party to “do the finances” often the husband. I am not suggesting that this is wrong. It does pose a challenge when the relationship changes though either of the two D’s – death or divorce.

The Book of Truth

One book that does not lie is a chequebook (remember those?). This provides an account, warts and all – how we all use our money. There is no hiding. Sometimes the reading is depressing, sometimes encouraging. It certainly tells a story. The Wife is a pretty good story too, here is the trailer.

Dominic Thomas
Solomons IFA

You can read more articles about Pensions, Wealth Management, Retirement, Investments, Financial Planning and Estate Planning on my blog which gets updated every week. If you would like to talk to me about your personal wealth planning and how we can make you stay wealthier for longer then please get in touch by calling 08000 736 273 or email info@solomonsifa.co.uk

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THE WIFE2018-10-05T11:13:48+00:00